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Green Card Lawyer

Green Card Lawyer

Welcome to the Web site of immigration lawyer David M. Levin. Presented as a public service, this site has been designed to provide information to exceptional foreign citizens seeking a “green card” in order to permanently reside and work in the United States of America.

Foreign nationals seeking to live and work permanently in the United States (U.S.), must obtain an immigrant visa under the terms of the Immigration and Naturalization Act. Immigrant visas, commonly referred to as “green cards”, fall into two major categories: visas or green cards that are Family Based, and visas or green cards that are Employment Based.

There are two major classifications of Family Based green cards: immediate relatives and preference immigrants.

Spouses of US citizens, minor children (under the age of 21) of US citizens, and parents of US citizens where the citizen is at least 21 years of age, may qualify for Family Based green cards as “immediate relatives”.

First Preference green cards may be issued to unmarried sons or daughters of US citizens who are under 21 years of age.

Second Preference green cards may be issued to spouses or children of foreign nationals lawfully admitted into the US for permanent residence. Second Preference green cards may also be issued to unmarried sons or daughters of foreign nationals lawfully admitted into the US for permanent residence who are 21 years of age and older.

Third Preference green cards may be issued to married sons or daughters of US citizens.

Fourth Preference green cards may be issued to brothers or sisters of citizens of the US, if such citizens are at least 21 years of age.

There is an overall cap upon the number of Family Based green cards issued annually. There is also an annual per-country cap upon the number of Family Based green cards issued. This limitation, however, does not apply to green cards issued to immediate relatives.

Employment Based green cards are divided into four major classes: “EB-1” green cards (workers of extraordinary ability, outstanding professors and researchers, and multinational executives and managers); “EB-2” green cards (members of professions holding advanced degrees and aliens of exceptional ability in the sciences, arts and business); “EB-3” green cards (skilled workers and professionals without advanced degrees); and “EB-5” green cards (investors of at least $1 million in a U.S. business).¬†

For more comprehensive information regarding US immigration for immigrants, as well as, non-immigrants please see

EB-1
EB-2
EB-5